Agenda 21 Declares War On Mankind

Jurriaan Maessen

In the last couple of years the omnipresent force known as Agenda 21 is meeting with increasing resistance worldwide. With the rise of the alternative media, the flow of decade-long propaganda efforts is finally being hindered. As a result of rocks thrown in the stream- the once steady water flow is now exposing itself at every turn as it’s forced to bend and twist its way forward. Ironically, the UN and its affiliate accomplices have themselves to thank for the counter-effort. The internet- as well as some pretty thorough archiving on the part of these transnational bureaucracies- have allowed researchers to withdraw information directly from the lion’s den. As a result of this development, we can display a plethora of documents, often written by UN personnel and ideologues, that prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that there is a concerted strategy in place to brainwash (there’s no other name for it) the human population of the planet into accepting Agenda 21 and its inherent depopulation proposals. Furthermore, this pool of document has revealed a plan to de-industrialize the west and to use the “green agenda” to do so. In the last few decades Agenda 21 has been UN policy, and all of its subdivisions were commanded to fall in line.

Throwing rocks however, is not enough to stall the multi-winged creature that is Agenda 21. What do free people do when confronted with tyranny designed to target people in their local communities? Methinks nothing short of a war declaration is in order to push back the effort. As is custom when declaring war, there first needs to be a listing of the arguments for the war declared.

Exhibit A: De-Industrializing the West

A 1991 policy paper prepared for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) by Professor Jeffrey Sachs outlines a strategy for the transfer of wealth in name of the environment to be implemented in the course of 35 to 40 years. As it turns out, it is a visionary paper describing phase by phase the road to world dictatorship under Agenda 21. As the professor states in the paper:

“To be meaningful, the strategies should cover the time-span of several decades. Thirty-five to forty years seems a good compromise between the need to give enough time to the postulated transformations and the uncertainties brought about by the lengthening of the time-span.”

In his paper The Next 40 Years: Transition Strategies to the Virtuous Green Path: North/South/East/Global, Sachs accurately describes not only the intended time-span to bring about a global society, but also what steps should be taken to ensure “population stabilization”:

“In order to stabilize the populations of the South by means other than wars or epidemics, mere campaigning for birth control and distributing of contraceptives has proved fairly inefficient.”

In the first part of the (in retrospect) bizarrely accurate description of current events as they unfold, Sachs points out redistribution of wealth is the only viable path towards population stabilization and- as he calls it- a “virtuous green world”. The professor:

“The way out from the double bind of poverty and environmental disruption calls for a fairly long period of more economic growth to sustain the transition strategies towards the virtuous green path of what has been called in Stockholm ecodevelopement and has since changed its name in Anglo-Saxon countries to sustainable development.”

“(…) a fair degree of agreement seems to exist, therefore, about the ideal development path to be followed so long as we do not manage to stabilize the world population and, at the same time, sharply reduce the inequalities prevailing today.”, the professor states.

“The bolder the steps taken in the near future”, Sachs asserts, “the shorter will be the time span that separates us from a steady state. Radical solutions must address to the roots of the problem and not to its symptoms. Theoretically, the transition could be made shorter by measures of redistribution of assets and income.”

Sachs points to the political difficulties of such proposals being implemented (because free humanity tends to distrust any national government let alone transnational government to redistribute its well-earned wealth). He therefore proposes these measures to be implemented gradually, following a meticulously planned strategy:

“The pragmatic prospect is one of transition extending itself over several decades.”

In the second sub-chapter “The Five Dimensions of Ecodevelopment”, professor Sachs sums up the main dimensions of this carefully outlined move to make Agenda 21 a very real future prospect. The first dimension he touches upon is “Social Sustainability”:

“The aim is to build a civilization of being within greater equity in asset and income distribution, so as to improve substantially the entitlements of the broad masses of population and of reduce the gap in standards of living between the have and the have nots.”

This of course means, reducing the standards of living in “The North” (U.S., Europe) and upgrading those of the developing nations (“The South and The East”). This would have to be realized through what Sachs calls “Economic Sustainability”: “made possible by a more efficient allocation and management of resources and a steady flow of public and private investment.”

The third dimension described by the professor is “Ecological Sustainability” which, among other things, limits “the consumption of fossil fuels and other easily deplete-able or environmentally harmful products, substituting them by renewable and/or plentiful and environmentally friendly resources, reducing the volume of pollutants by means of energy and resource conservation and recycling and, last but not least, promoting self-constraint in material consumption on part of the rich countries and of the privileged social strata all over the world.”

In order to make this happen Sachs stresses the need of “defining the rules for adequate environmental protection, designing the institutional machinery and choosing the mix of economic, legal and administrative instruments necessary for the implementation of environmental policies.”


to read more see

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *